Bases for an Origin

01/09/2008 - 02:28 von Jon G. | Report spam
Any origin is never an infinitesimal point, but a sphere of small radius
that forms a basis for measurement. When the radius is small, the sphere
approximates an infinitesimal point, and measurements from either the inner
or outer surface of the sphere are the same. For a sphere of large radius,
events are measured from either the inner or outer surface of the sphere, as
well. Consequently, inverted space is the same reality as noninverted
space, as I demonstrate with the mathematics at my web page,

http://mypeoplepc.com/members/jon83.../id18.html
 

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#1 fishfry
01/09/2008 - 03:47 | Warnen spam
In article ,
"Jon G." wrote:

Any origin is never an infinitesimal point, but a sphere of small radius
that forms a basis for measurement. When the radius is small, the sphere
approximates an infinitesimal point, and measurements from either the inner
or outer surface of the sphere are the same.



Stop right there and explain, please. What do you mean by the outer and
inner surface? The surface of a sphere has no thickness.

If you're thinking of a sphere made, say, out of physical material, so
that it has some thickness, then the outer and inner surface area are
ALWAYS a little different, regardless of how small the radius gets.

You have to explain what you mean.

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