Das Kalenderblatt 091027

26/10/2009 - 16:54 von WM | Report spam
Betrachten wir die Basis-2-Entwicklung einer natürlichen Zahl
13 = 2^3 + 2^2 + 2^0 = 2^3 + 2^2 + 1
und drücken die Exponenten > 2 ebenfalls in der Basis 2 aus
3 = 2^1 + 1 = 2 + 1
so erhalten wir die reine Darstellung zur Basis 2:
13 = 2^(2 + 1) + 2^2 + 1
Die Darstellung zur Basis 3 würde so aussehen:
13 = 3^2 + 3 + 1
und wàre bereits rein.

Die Goodsteinfolge G(n) = n, n', n'', ... einer natürlichen Zahl n
ergibt sich, wenn man in ihrer reinen Basis-2-Darstellung überall 2
durch 3 ersetzt und die so sich ergebende Zahl n' um 1 vermindert,
sodann in der reinen Basis-3-Darstellung überall 3 durch 4 ersetzt und
die so sich ergebende Zahl n'' um 1 vermindert usw.
Beispiel 1: Das erste Glied der Folge G(2)
n = 2 = 2^1
liefert das zweite Glied
n' = 3^1 - 1 = 2
und das dritte Glied
n'' = 2 - 1 = 1
denn die Basis 3, die in n'' durch 4 ersetzt würde, ist in n' nicht
vorhanden. Im nàchsten Schritt wird die Null erreicht, womit die Folge
per Definition endet. Diese Goodsteinfolge ist also
G(2) = 2, 2, 1, 0
Beispiel 2: Das erste Glied der Folge G(13)
n = 13 = 2^(2 + 1) + 2^2 + 1
liefert das zweite Glied
n' = 3^(3 + 1) + 3^3 + 1 - 1
= 3^(3 + 1) + 3^3 = 108
Im nàchsten Schritt wird die rechte Potenz angeknabbert:
n'' = 4^(4 + 1) + 4^4 - 1
= 4^(4 + 1) + 3*4^3 + 3*4^2+ 3*4 + 3 = 1279
Nach drei weiteren Schritten ist die 3 verbraucht und im vierten es
geht dem vorletzten Term an den Kragen, dann also 3*8 = 2*8 + 7.
Große n führen offenbar zu rasant ansteigende Folgen. Trotzdem sagt
der Satz von Goodstein dass jede Folge G(n) nach endlich vielen
Schritten bei 0 endet (denn wenn die Basis größer geworden ist als die
Zahl, gibt es nichts mehr zu ersetzen und die wiederholte Subtraktion
von 1 zieht die Folge auf 0.)
Zum "Beweis" ersetzt man die Basis sogleich durch omega (w).
2^(2 + 1) + 2^2 + 1
wird damit zu
a = w^(w + 1) + w^w + 1
Die nàchsten Folgenglieder besitzen also dieselbe Basis w, werden
jedoch in jedem Schritt um 1 kleiner:
a' = w^(w + 1) + w^w
a'' = w^(w + 1) + w^w - 1 = ?
w^w - 1 erzwingt nun die Verminderung von w^w um 1. Wie das? Und wie
geht das? Wenn man von Unendlich 1 abzieht, hat man doch immer noch
unendlich!?
(Fortsetzung folgt.)
[R. Goodstein: "On the restricted ordinal theorem", Journal of
Symbolic Logic, 9 (1944) 33-41]
http://curvebank.calstatela.edu/goo...dstein.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodstein%27s_theorem

Gruß, WM
 

Lesen sie die antworten

#1 Ralf Bader
26/10/2009 - 18:34 | Warnen spam
WM wrote:


Betrachten wir die Basis-2-Entwicklung einer natürlichen Zahl
13 = 2^3 + 2^2 + 2^0 = 2^3 + 2^2 + 1
und drücken die Exponenten > 2 ebenfalls in der Basis 2 aus
3 = 2^1 + 1 = 2 + 1
so erhalten wir die reine Darstellung zur Basis 2:
13 = 2^(2 + 1) + 2^2 + 1
Die Darstellung zur Basis 3 würde so aussehen:
13 = 3^2 + 3 + 1
und wàre bereits rein.

Die Goodsteinfolge G(n) = n, n', n'', ... einer natürlichen Zahl n
ergibt sich, wenn man in ihrer reinen Basis-2-Darstellung überall 2
durch 3 ersetzt und die so sich ergebende Zahl n' um 1 vermindert,
sodann in der reinen Basis-3-Darstellung überall 3 durch 4 ersetzt und
die so sich ergebende Zahl n'' um 1 vermindert usw.
Beispiel 1: Das erste Glied der Folge G(2)
n = 2 = 2^1
liefert das zweite Glied
n' = 3^1 - 1 = 2
und das dritte Glied
n'' = 2 - 1 = 1
denn die Basis 3, die in n'' durch 4 ersetzt würde, ist in n' nicht
vorhanden. Im nàchsten Schritt wird die Null erreicht, womit die Folge
per Definition endet. Diese Goodsteinfolge ist also
G(2) = 2, 2, 1, 0
Beispiel 2: Das erste Glied der Folge G(13)
n = 13 = 2^(2 + 1) + 2^2 + 1
liefert das zweite Glied
n' = 3^(3 + 1) + 3^3 + 1 - 1
= 3^(3 + 1) + 3^3 = 108
Im nàchsten Schritt wird die rechte Potenz angeknabbert:
n'' = 4^(4 + 1) + 4^4 - 1
= 4^(4 + 1) + 3*4^3 + 3*4^2+ 3*4 + 3 = 1279
Nach drei weiteren Schritten ist die 3 verbraucht und im vierten es
geht dem vorletzten Term an den Kragen, dann also 3*8 = 2*8 + 7.
Große n führen offenbar zu rasant ansteigende Folgen. Trotzdem sagt
der Satz von Goodstein dass jede Folge G(n) nach endlich vielen
Schritten bei 0 endet (denn wenn die Basis größer geworden ist als die
Zahl, gibt es nichts mehr zu ersetzen und die wiederholte Subtraktion
von 1 zieht die Folge auf 0.)
Zum "Beweis" ersetzt man die Basis sogleich durch omega (w).
2^(2 + 1) + 2^2 + 1
wird damit zu
a = w^(w + 1) + w^w + 1
Die nàchsten Folgenglieder besitzen also dieselbe Basis w, werden
jedoch in jedem Schritt um 1 kleiner:
a' = w^(w + 1) + w^w
a'' = w^(w + 1) + w^w - 1 = ?
w^w - 1 erzwingt nun die Verminderung von w^w um 1. Wie das? Und wie
geht das? Wenn man von Unendlich 1 abzieht, hat man doch immer noch
unendlich!?



Nicht möglich ist, Ihnen das begreiflich zu machen.

(Fortsetzung folgt.)
[R. Goodstein: "On the restricted ordinal theorem", Journal of
Symbolic Logic, 9 (1944) 33-41]
http://curvebank.calstatela.edu/goo...dstein.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodstein%27s_theorem

Gruß, WM



"I remember the first years I was doing research, I worked alone, at home,
but every Thursday,
I attended Choquet’s seminar. And he shone by his intelligence, his wit.
There were questions
bursting out, it was extremely open. This shaped me, in depth. And Choquet
had something
unique : he had been very close to the Polish school of mathematics before
the war. And
so he knew a lot of things which do not make up the usual curriculum of
mathematicians,
but which in fact are quite interesting. It is only with Choquet for
instance that I learnt
the theory of ordinals. You might think that this theory is useless, but
that’s absolutely
false. For instance, I remember once, the IHES had an open-door day, there
was a first-grade
class, little kids and among them a girl with shining intelligence, and so
after the subject of
undecidability had been brought up, I gave them an example from the theory
of ordinals, the
story of the hare and the tortoise. You take a number N , not too big, they
had taken 5 or
something like that. They had learnt to write numbers in various bases, 2,
3, etc. I explained
to them that one writes the number in base 2, then the hare comes and
replaces all the 2’s
by 3’s ; thus 5 = 22 + 1 gets replaced by 33 + 1 = 28... and the tortoise
just subtracts 1 ; then
one writes the result in base 3, and the hare comes and replaces all the 3’s
by 4’s ; and the
tortoise subtracts 1 again, etc. Well, the extraordinary phenomenon which
comes from the
theory of ordinals, is that the tortoise wins : after a finite number of
steps and even though
you have the impression that the hare makes absolutely gigantic jumps each
time, you get
0 ! And what’s hard to believe, it is that this cannot be proved in the
framework of Peano
arithmetic. The proof uses the theory of ordinals ! You can in fact show
that the number of
steps required before the tortoise wins is growing faster than any function
of N you can write
explicitely. You can see on the computer how many steps it takes to reach 0.
But the proof
that the tortoise wins, takes one line with the theory of ordinals. What do
you do ? You take
the first number and instead of replacing the 2’s by 3’s, then by 4’s, etc.,
you replace them by
the ordinal ω. For example 5 is 22 + 1, so you write ω ω + 1. This is an
ordinal, and an ordinal
is a well-ordered set, and every decreasing sequence of ordinals necessarily
stops. Now when
you do the hare’s move, it doesn’t change anything, but the tortoise’s move
subtracts 1 and
you obtain in this way a strictly decreasing sequence of ordinals, this has
to stop, and you
have the proof. And this proof uses ω^ω^ ω^... so it is not so surprising
that it goes beyond Peano
arithmetic. This is typical of the kind of things we discussed at Choquet’s
seminar. And this
is a partly-forgotten mathematical culture, but which is in fact an
extremely rich one. We
live in a mathematical world which is more and more monocultural."
- Alain Connes,
http://www.alainconnes.org/docs/Inteng.pdf

Kürzlich hat jemand das Projekt einer zerokulturalen "mathematischen Welt"
ausgebrütet. Er nannte das "Matherealismus".

How lucky we are that Cantor introduced curly brackets! But it was no
he who introduced the silly distinction between a and {a} that enables
so called mathematicians to build card houses on nothing.
(Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Mückenheim, FH Augsburg, in sci.math, 03/13/09)

Ähnliche fragen