Das Kalenderblatt 100306

05/03/2010 - 15:47 von WM | Report spam
Cantor had a different set of numinous feelings about the infinite. He
was not only a great mathematician, but a very religious man and by
some standards a mystic. Yet his mysticism was supported by his
mathematics, which to him was at least as strong an argument for the
mathematics as for the mysticism. Apart from claiming divine
inspiration for his work, we don't know exactly what spiritual views
he linked to his mathematics, but his theorems give support to the
following. Measured in meters, we are tiny specks compared to the
universe at large. But measured in dimensionless points, we are as
large as the universe: a proper subset, but one with the same
cardinality as the whole. Similarly, measured in meters, we may be off
in a corner of the universe. But measured in points, the distance is
equally great in all directions, whether universe is finite or
infinite; that puts us in the center, wherever we are. Measured in
days, our lives are insignificant hiccups in the expanse of past and
future time. But measured in points of time, our lives are as long as
universe is old. We are as small as we seem, but simultaneously, by a
most reasonable measure, co-extensive with the totality of being in
both space and time. {{Schon daran sollte sich eigentlich leicht
erkennen lassen, wie "reasonable" dieses Maß ist.}}

[Peter Suber: "Infinite Refletions", St. John's Review, XLIV, 2 (1998)
1-59]
http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/writing/infinity.htm#sublimity

Gruß, WM
 

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#1 The Pioneer
05/03/2010 - 22:30 | Warnen spam
On 5 Mrz., 15:47, WM wrote:
Cantor had a different set of numinous feelings about the infinite. He
was not only a great mathematician, but a very religious man and by
some standards a mystic. Yet his mysticism was supported by his
mathematics, which to him was at least as strong an argument for the
mathematics as for the mysticism. Apart from claiming divine
inspiration for his work, we don't know exactly what spiritual views
he linked to his mathematics, but his theorems give support to the
following. Measured in meters, we are tiny specks compared to the
universe at large. But measured in dimensionless points, we are as
large as the universe: a proper subset, but one with the same
cardinality as the whole. Similarly, measured in meters, we may be off
in a corner of the universe. But measured in points, the distance is
equally great in all directions, whether universe is finite or
infinite; that puts us in the center, wherever we are. Measured in
days, our lives are insignificant hiccups in the expanse of past and
future time. But measured in points of time, our lives are as long as
universe is old. We are as small as we seem, but simultaneously, by a
most reasonable measure, co-extensive with the totality of being in
both space and time. {{Schon daran sollte sich eigentlich leicht
erkennen lassen, wie "reasonable" dieses Maß ist.}}

[Peter Suber: "Infinite Refletions", St. John's Review, XLIV, 2 (1998)
1-59]http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/writing/infinity.htm#sublimity

Gruß, WM



Wie groß ist die Ehre hier ?

Jetzt mach ich mal folgendes : Ich lese jeden Tag mein Thermometer ab
und blogge die Temperatur hier rein.

Dann sind ALLE MEINE AUSSAGEN WAHR, und ICH kriege die Nichte von
Einstein !

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