komplett OT, aber vielleicht interessiert´s jemanden:

13/03/2014 - 16:01 von Klaus Esser | Report spam
"...Perhaps as a consequence human hearing is extraordinarily sensitive
to pitch. A musician can tune an instrument to one part in one thousand,
and the average music lover can perceive tuning to at least an accuracy
of one percent. This is amazing, given the frequency selectivity of the
basilar membrane, which is about one part in five. Such pitch acuity did
not evolve by accident. It must play a fundamental role in our ability
to hear – and might help us understand how to measure acoustics."


http://www.davidgriesinger.com/IOA2...eprint.doc


herzlichst, Klaus

“Simplicity is the keynote of all true elegance.”
― Coco Chanel
 

Lesen sie die antworten

#1 Oliver Jennrich
13/03/2014 - 22:18 | Warnen spam
Klaus Esser writes:

"...Perhaps as a consequence human hearing is extraordinarily
sensitive to pitch. A musician can tune an instrument to one part in
one thousand, and the average music lover can perceive tuning to at
least an accuracy of one percent. This is amazing, given the frequency
selectivity of the basilar membrane, which is about one part in
five.



Also ein SNR von 200 oder etwa 23 dB. Das ist nun nicht weiter
erstaunlich, finde ich (abgesehen davon, dass ich vermutlich nichtmal in
den Prozent-Bereich komme).

S/W Fotos: http://500px.com/oliver_jennrich
Google+ : https://plus.google.com/+OliverJennrich/photos
Flickr : http://www.flickr.com/photos/oliver_jennrich

Ähnliche fragen