MI5 Persecution: Neil Fox (March/1998) (5679)

25/08/2007 - 14:20 von MI5Victim | Report spam
Neil Fox's Juke Box on Capital Radio (week ending 15/March/1998)

Certainty level: 70%

Here is an excerpt from Neil Fox's show on Capital Radio 95.8FM, sometime
during the week ending Sunday 15/March/1998 (probably during the weekend,
but I don't remember).

First I will give the text of the conversation between Neil Fox and
telephone caller Martin, then I will state my interpretation.

(conversation) (F=Dr Fox, M=Martin the caller)

F: coming up on the jukebox, the hotline's 0171-4848-958, just a quick shout
here and so who's this going to be then Mr Producer?
(staff, shouting) MARTIN!
F: Couldn't quite hear you, it's going to be?
(staff, normal voice) Martin.
F: Thank you. Martin, hello.
M: Hello, Foxy.
F: How are you Martin.
M: Er, knackered.
F: Why?
M: Didn't get much sleep last night. Party down the road.
F: What time did you go to bed?
M: Four o'clock this morning.
F: Well that sounds quite a reasonable Saturday night if you ask me.
M: I was up at eight.
F: You were up at eight this morning?
M: Yeah.
F: That's sick. Why? What on earth made you get out of bed at eight this
morning?
M: My father.
F: Well that's no good. Why is he being sicko, is he being a sadist?
M: No, he out there, sort of clearing room.
F: Listen, is your dad there?
M: No, he's downstairs.
F: Oh mate, can you get him?
M: No.
F: Does he not let you on the phone? The only reason is that I wouldn't mind
having a chat with someone who makes anyone get up at eight o'clock on a
Sunday morning. I'm sorry, that's ill isn't it, that's out of order.
M: It's sick.
F: I'm just going to ask around here. What do you think then, eight o'clock
Sunday morning? That's out of order isn't it, for any father?
(staff) Yeah, definitely.
F: Is he like victimising you or something, is there any reason why he wanted
you up at eight o'clock? To clean your room?
M: Well as I say I got up at eight this morning to clean my room and it looks
worse that it did yesterday.
F: Well I should have just left it and stayed in there until eleven o'clock
if I was you.
M: Well I was up, I didn't get out of bed.
F: What, you didn't get out of bed at eight o'clock? No, he woke you up at
eight o'clock. Did you do any cleaning at all?
M: I haven't touched my bedroom.
F: Top man. Boy you're going to get your arse kicked later aren't you. Now
a song for you, what can we play?
M: Guns and Roses, "Sweet Child of Mine".
F: And we're going to dedicate this to your father?
M: No we're not, we'll dedicate this to my good mate Jamie, who's sitting
on the bed now.
F: Right, hello Jamie. And anyone else? Any top totty in your life at the
moment?
M: Unfortunately no.
F: The totty factor is quite low at the moment is it?
M: It's dead.
F: It's dead? What, nothing?
M: Nothing.
F: What, zero? Well, that's pathetic. No wonder you're down. You stay out
til four o'clock and nothing. We'd better have words when we're off the
radio I think. We need to give you a team talk. You have a good night tonight.
M: And you.
F: Take care.
(song starts)
F: Actually something was going through my mind. I think I'll leave it.

I'm not really sure whether this is in any way about me. It probably isn't.
Probably it's just my nasty suspicious mind finding links where none exist.
However, here is an explanation of why it might, possibly, be about me.

Throughout this interview, I was throwing abuse at the radio, and to my mind,
Neil Fox was hearing the abuse, and responding interactively. This explains
why he sounds so stressed when talking to telephone caller Martin, and the
general violence of his words including "Boy you're going to get your arse
kicked later aren't you".

The piece starts of with the producer shouting the name of the caller, which
might be related to my loud vocalisations at the radio. The trouble starts
off with Fox saying "That's sick". "Sick" might be taken as a reference to my
condition. Then Fox says, "Why is he being sicko, is he being a sadist?",
again sick = my illness, "sadist" = attitude of my oppressors towards me.
"that's ill isn't it" = further comment on my illness. "Is he like
victimising you or something" = again what my enemies are doing to me.

Fox sounds quite happy when he gets Martin to say "It's sick"; as you would
expect him to, if the comment were directed at me. It is a constant feature
of my enemies' harassment of me that they get intermediaries to verbalise the
abuse. Immediately after saying "victimising you" Fox gives a little laugh,
to show he thinks the victimisation (of me, not Martin) is funny.

Fox gets increasingly nasty as the piece progresses. "Boy you're going to get
your arse kicked later aren't you" is not really what you would expect him to
say if he were just talking to Martin. Fox is on the same side as Martin, so
why would he be so verbally aggressive to him? On the other hand, if the
piece is about me, then his strong words start to make sense.

Fox's jubilation at finding that Martin's "totty factor" is "dead" again
doesn't make much sense unless you think that he might not be considering
Martin's totty factor, but mine, since it's a fairly well known fact that my
"totty factor" is not significantly above zero.

To round off the 135 second interchange, just as the next track is starting,
Fox says, "Actually something was going through my mind. I think I'll leave
it". Given that I was chucking abuse at Fox throughout, it is only natural
for him have thought up a reply that he would have wished to have made,
except that such a reply would (a) probably not be suitable for a family
show, and (b) have given the game away completely.

So there you are. You the jury, what say you in the case of plaintiff vs.
Neil Fox's Juke Box, guilty or not guilty?

5679


Posted via NewsDemon.com - Premium Uncensored Newsgroup Service
->>>>>>http://www.NewsDemon.com<<<<<<
Unlimited Access, Anonymous Accounts, Uncensored Broadband Access
 

Lesen sie die antworten

#1 Jumbo
25/08/2007 - 23:44 | Warnen spam
On Aug 25, 1:20 pm, wrote:
Neil Fox's Juke Box on Capital Radio (week ending 15/March/1998)

Certainty level: 70%

Here is an excerpt from Neil Fox's show on Capital Radio 95.8FM, sometime
during the week ending Sunday 15/March/1998 (probably during the weekend,
but I don't remember).

First I will give the text of the conversation between Neil Fox and
telephone caller Martin, then I will state my interpretation.

(conversation) (F=Dr Fox, M=Martin the caller)

F: coming up on the jukebox, the hotline's 0171-4848-958, just a quick shout
here and so who's this going to be then Mr Producer?
(staff, shouting) MARTIN!
F: Couldn't quite hear you, it's going to be?
(staff, normal voice) Martin.
F: Thank you. Martin, hello.
M: Hello, Foxy.
F: How are you Martin.
M: Er, knackered.
F: Why?
M: Didn't get much sleep last night. Party down the road.
F: What time did you go to bed?
M: Four o'clock this morning.
F: Well that sounds quite a reasonable Saturday night if you ask me.
M: I was up at eight.
F: You were up at eight this morning?
M: Yeah.
F: That's sick. Why? What on earth made you get out of bed at eight this
morning?
M: My father.
F: Well that's no good. Why is he being sicko, is he being a sadist?
M: No, he out there, sort of clearing room.
F: Listen, is your dad there?
M: No, he's downstairs.
F: Oh mate, can you get him?
M: No.
F: Does he not let you on the phone? The only reason is that I wouldn't mind
having a chat with someone who makes anyone get up at eight o'clock on a
Sunday morning. I'm sorry, that's ill isn't it, that's out of order.
M: It's sick.
F: I'm just going to ask around here. What do you think then, eight o'clock
Sunday morning? That's out of order isn't it, for any father?
(staff) Yeah, definitely.
F: Is he like victimising you or something, is there any reason why he wanted
you up at eight o'clock? To clean your room?
M: Well as I say I got up at eight this morning to clean my room and it looks
worse that it did yesterday.
F: Well I should have just left it and stayed in there until eleven o'clock
if I was you.
M: Well I was up, I didn't get out of bed.
F: What, you didn't get out of bed at eight o'clock? No, he woke you up at
eight o'clock. Did you do any cleaning at all?
M: I haven't touched my bedroom.
F: Top man. Boy you're going to get your arse kicked later aren't you. Now
a song for you, what can we play?
M: Guns and Roses, "Sweet Child of Mine".
F: And we're going to dedicate this to your father?
M: No we're not, we'll dedicate this to my good mate Jamie, who's sitting
on the bed now.
F: Right, hello Jamie. And anyone else? Any top totty in your life at the
moment?
M: Unfortunately no.
F: The totty factor is quite low at the moment is it?
M: It's dead.
F: It's dead? What, nothing?
M: Nothing.
F: What, zero? Well, that's pathetic. No wonder you're down. You stay out
til four o'clock and nothing. We'd better have words when we're off the
radio I think. We need to give you a team talk. You have a good night tonight.
M: And you.
F: Take care.
(song starts)
F: Actually something was going through my mind. I think I'll leave it.

I'm not really sure whether this is in any way about me. It probably isn't.
Probably it's just my nasty suspicious mind finding links where none exist.
However, here is an explanation of why it might, possibly, be about me.

Throughout this interview, I was throwing abuse at the radio, and to my mind,
Neil Fox was hearing the abuse, and responding interactively. This explains
why he sounds so stressed when talking to telephone caller Martin, and the
general violence of his words including "Boy you're going to get your arse
kicked later aren't you".

The piece starts of with the producer shouting the name of the caller, which
might be related to my loud vocalisations at the radio. The trouble starts
off with Fox saying "That's sick". "Sick" might be taken as a reference to my
condition. Then Fox says, "Why is he being sicko, is he being a sadist?",
again sick = my illness, "sadist" = attitude of my oppressors towards me.
"that's ill isn't it" = further comment on my illness. "Is he like
victimising you or something" = again what my enemies are doing to me.

Fox sounds quite happy when he gets Martin to say "It's sick"; as you would
expect him to, if the comment were directed at me. It is a constant feature
of my enemies' harassment of me that they get intermediaries to verbalise the
abuse. Immediately after saying "victimising you" Fox gives a little laugh,
to show he thinks the victimisation (of me, not Martin) is funny.

Fox gets increasingly nasty as the piece progresses. "Boy you're going to get
your arse kicked later aren't you" is not really what you would expect him to
say if he were just talking to Martin. Fox is on the same side as Martin, so
why would he be so verbally aggressive to him? On the other hand, if the
piece is about me, then his strong words start to make sense.

Fox's jubilation at finding that Martin's "totty factor" is "dead" again
doesn't make much sense unless you think that he might not be considering
Martin's totty factor, but mine, since it's a fairly well known fact that my
"totty factor" is not significantly above zero.

To round off the 135 second interchange, just as the next track is starting,
Fox says, "Actually something was going through my mind. I think I'll leave
it". Given that I was chucking abuse at Fox throughout, it is only natural
for him have thought up a reply that he would have wished to have made,
except that such a reply would (a) probably not be suitable for a family
show, and (b) have given the game away completely.

So there you are. You the jury, what say you in the case of plaintiff vs.
Neil Fox's Juke Box, guilty or not guilty?





How do you work out your certainty levels?

Ähnliche fragen