Warwick Sonic III amp

15/03/2009 - 15:04 von N_Cook | Report spam
Not the cause of the problem that it is here for repair, but I cannot return
it to the owner with this glaring potential (in both senses) fault,
presumably the same for all such Warwick amps.
One large heatsink with +75V on it and the other at -75V and 2.5mm between
the two , both mounted on standard polyester pcb with chassis standoffs well
away from the heatsinks. Discharged both before this test of course,
requires only 1.5Kg of force between the 2 heatsinks to narrow the gap to
1.5mm.
Have amp designers never seen the internals of their stuff
resonating/oscillating mounted in or on speaker cabs, especially bass amps
such as this?

Diverse Devices, Southampton, England
electronic hints and repair briefs , schematics/manuals list on
http://home.graffiti.net/diverse:graffiti.net/
 

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#1 Meat Plow
16/03/2009 - 05:38 | Warnen spam
On Sun, 15 Mar 2009 14:04:12 -0000, "N_Cook" wrote:

Not the cause of the problem that it is here for repair, but I cannot return
it to the owner with this glaring potential (in both senses) fault,
presumably the same for all such Warwick amps.
One large heatsink with +75V on it and the other at -75V and 2.5mm between
the two , both mounted on standard polyester pcb with chassis standoffs well
away from the heatsinks. Discharged both before this test of course,
requires only 1.5Kg of force between the 2 heatsinks to narrow the gap to
1.5mm.
Have amp designers never seen the internals of their stuff
resonating/oscillating mounted in or on speaker cabs, especially bass amps
such as this?



Ran into similar design phenomena in a Berringer Euro Power powered
mixer. Left me sitting scratching my noggin wondering what the hell
were they thinking.

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